Reading and Phonics

HomeCurriculum SubjectsReading and Phonics

Key Stage 1 Reading & Phonics Provision

Intent 

Phonics (reading and spelling)

At Jolesfield we believe that all our children can become fluent readers and writers. This is why we teach reading through Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised, which is a systematic and synthetic phonics programme. We start teaching phonics in Reception and follow the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised progression, which ensures children build on their growing knowledge of the alphabetic code, mastering phonics to read and spell as they move through school.

As a result, all our children are able to tackle any unfamiliar words as they read. At Jolesfield we also model the application of the alphabetic code through phonics in shared reading and writing, both inside and outside of the phonics lesson and across the curriculum. We have a strong focus on language development for our children because we know that speaking and listening are crucial skills for reading and writing in all subjects.

Comprehension 

At Jolesfield, we value reading as a crucial life skill. By the time children leave us, they read confidently for meaning and regularly enjoy reading for pleasure. Our readers are equipped with the tools to tackle unfamiliar vocabulary. We encourage our children to see themselves as readers for both pleasure and purpose.

Implementation 

Daily phonics lessons in Reception and Year 1

At Jolesfield, we value reading as a crucial life skill. By the time children leave us, they read confidently for meaning and regularly enjoy reading for pleasure. Our readers are equipped with the tools to tackle unfamiliar vocabulary. We encourage our children to see themselves as readers for both pleasure and purpose.

Daily Keep-up lessons ensure every child learns to read 

Any child who needs additional practice has daily Keep-up support, taught by a fully trained adult. Keep-up lessons match the structure of class teaching, and use the same procedures, resources and mantras, but in smaller steps with more repetition, so that every child secures their learning.

We timetable daily phonics lessons for any child in Year 2 or 3 who is not fully fluent at reading or has not passed the Phonics Screening Check. These children urgently need to catch up, so the gap between themselves and their peers does not widen. We use the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised assessments to identify the gaps in their phonic knowledge and teach to these using the Keep-up resources – at pace. 

If any child in Year 3 to 6 has gaps in their phonic knowledge when reading or writing, we plan phonics ‘catch-up’ lessons to address specific reading/writing gaps. These short, sharp lessons last 10 minutes and take place at least three times a week. 

Teaching reading: Reading practice sessions four times a week

We teach children to read through reading practice sessions four times a week using the Big Cat fully decodable texts. 

These:

  • are taught by a fully trained adult to small groups of approximately six children
  • use books matched to the children’s secure phonic knowledge using the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised assessments and book matching grids on pages 11–20 of ‘Application of phonics to reading’
  • are monitored by the class teacher, who rotates and works with each group on a regular basis.

Each reading practice session has a clear focus, so that the demands of the session do not overload the children’s working memory. The reading practice sessions have been designed to focus on three key reading skills:

  • decoding
  • prosody: teaching children to read with understanding and expression
  • comprehension: teaching children to understand the text.

In Reception these sessions start in Week 4. Children who are not yet decoding have daily additional blending practice in small groups, so that they quickly learn to blend and can begin to read books.

In Year 2 and 3, we continue to teach reading in this way for any children who still need to practise reading with decodable books. 

Home Reading 

The decodable reading practice book is taken home to ensure success is shared with the family.

Reading for pleasure books also go home for parents to share and read to children.

Additional reading support for vulnerable children

Children in Reception and Year 1 who are receiving additional phonics Keep-up sessions read their reading practice book to an adult daily. 

As the children move from the fully decodable texts in Year 2/3 the children read in a daily reading group four sessions per week with texts recommended by West Sussex SLS. They are encouraged to borrow an ‘easy reader’ from the school library to read at home.

Ensuring consistency and pace of progress

Every teacher in our school has been trained to teach reading, so we have the same expectations of progress. We all use the same language, routines and resources to teach children to read so that we lower children’s cognitive load.

The Reading Leader and SLT regularly monitor and observe teaching; they use the summative data to identify children who need additional support and gaps in learning.

Ensuring reading for pleasure

‘Reading for pleasure is the single most important indicator of a child’s success.’ (OECD 2002)

‘The will influences the skill and vice versa.’ (OECD 201

  • We value reading for pleasure highly and work hard as a school to grow our Reading for Pleasure pedagogy.
  • We read to children every day. We choose these books carefully as we want children to experience a wide range of books, including books that reflect the children at Jolesfield and our local community as well as books that open windows into other worlds and cultures.
  • Every classroom has an inviting book corner that encourages a love for reading. We curate these books and talk about them to entice children to read a wide range of books.
  • In Reception, children have access to the reading corner every day in their free flow time and the books are continually refreshed.
  • Children from Reception onwards have a home reading record. The parent/carer records comments to share with the adults in school and the adults will write in this on a regular basis to ensure communication between home and school.
  • The school library is made available for classes to use at protected times.Children across the school have regular opportunities to engage with a wide range of Reading for Pleasure events (book fairs, author visits and workshops, national events etc).

Impact

Assessment

Assessment is used to monitor progress and to identify any child needing additional support as soon as they need it.

Assessment for learning is used:

  • daily within class to identify children needing Keep-up support
  • weekly in the Review lesson to assess gaps, address these immediately and secure fluency of GPCs, words and spellings.

Summative assessment is used:

  • every six weeks to assess progress, to identify gaps in learning that need to be addressed, to identify any children needing additional support and to plan the Keep-up support that they need.
  • by SLT and scrutinised through the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised assessment tracker, to narrow attainment gaps between different groups of children and so that any additional support for teachers can be put into place.

Statutory assessment

Children in Year 1 sit the Phonics Screening Check. Any child not passing the check re-sits it in Year 2.

Ongoing assessment for catch-up

Children in Year 2 to 6 are assessed through their teacher’s ongoing formative assessment as well as  through the half-termly Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised summative assessments.

Key Stage 2 Reading Provision

In Key Stage 2, we are committed to stimulating a passion for reading and we pride ourselves on our promotion of children reading for pleasure. We take inspiration from leading names in the field of literature, who state: ‘It is not enough to simply teach children to read; we have to give them something worth reading. Something that will stretch their imaginations, something that will help them make sense of their own lives and encourage them to reach out toward people whose lives are quite different from their own” (Katherine Patterson). 

Therefore, reading for pleasure is a core part of every child’s educational entitlement in Key Stage 2. We believe that extensive exposure to a wide range of texts (both fictional and non-fictional) significantly contributes to every child’s achievement. This is because it broadens their minds and exposes them to new vocabulary and understanding.  We aim for our pupils to become lifelong readers for purpose and pleasure. We enhance both the child’s fluency and comprehension ability across all genres of texts. This is achieved by daily independent reading for pleasure; whole-class text study; daily comprehension activities and through exposing children to a wealth of texts.

We strongly believe that by providing our children with the life-long gift of reading, we show them that literature has the power to console, heal, transform and inspire them, for the rest of their lives. We promote the fact that reading can enhance a child’s literacy skills in all areas- particularly writing. Therefore, we use our class text(s) to stimulate our writing. All pupils will study chosen class-texts in depth and complete a whole unit of work based around a particular book. 

The reading provision in Key Stage 2 at Jolesfield CE Primary School consists of the following main elements:

  • Having a quality literature spine across the Key Stage from Years 3 to 6;
  • Studying class novels daily with relevant accompanying reading activities;
  • Having an effective home reading system
  • Promoting whole-school reading challenges and competitions to stimulate a love of reading.

All of our staff in Key Stage 2 act as reading role models and continuously share and promote their pleasure and enjoyment of a wide variety of texts. The sharing and discussion about books and other reading materials are frequent and regular. Moreover, all pupils have access to a wide range of fiction, poetry and non-fiction in different formats. We are always willing to widen our knowledge of what is available to interest all children and regularly purchase new books, to keep our library shelves up to date. 

Furthermore, each classroom has a designated reading area that is used to promote independent reading for pleasure, on a daily basis. 

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